I Am One With The Jaguar

I AM ONE WITH THE JAGUAR

This is a series of spells and poems that will protect me and guide me through my journey into the underworld. The spells/poems are based on the Mayan language which used logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs. The process begins with a meditation session to reveal a vision/message for each piece then I create the artwork. I have always been obsessed with the preparation and training required for my soul to enter the underworld and the path that my artwork will create to guide me into this unknown experience. 

Jamie Martinez, PERMISSION, 2020, clay, paint, spell, marker, scratches, wood, dirt, snake plants, caulk, 36 x 26 x 18 inches
PERMISSION (hands only), 2020, paint, marker and scratches on clay, 14 x 5 inches

In this sculpture, I am materializing a vision from Chichaan asking the Mayan Gods God A and God L for permission to use my hands in the underworld and the afterlife. I honor and sacrifice them in this lifetime so when I transition into the afterlife through the cave, I can have access to them again. There are two original spells I wrote, one on each hand, asking for permission. To decipher them, start with the right hand (your left) from top to bottom then the same for the left hand ending in the knuckles. 

Jamie Martinez, Kaloomte’ Bahlam Shrine, 2020, embroidered painting, clay sculptures, wood boat with sculpture inside, cacao, salt, coffee, gold and silver leaves, moss, dirt, crystals, herbs, 50 x 50 inches

This SHRINE is inspired by a story taken from the Mayan Jaguar Stone Books – It’s the tale of The Kaloomte’ Bahlam who battled his younger brother Lord Tzelek for control of the empire.  The glyphs on top of the painting tell this unique story  which reads: “Lord 6 Dog, Holy Lord of the Jaguar Kingdom – the Kalomte’, battled against Lord Tzelek his younger brother”. 

DRESDEN CODEX LEAF (1 – 4), 2020, paint, marker and scratches on clay, 24.4 x 10 inches. The four Banana leaf size codex combine to make a banana plant.

The Dresden Codex is a Mayan book, the oldest surviving from the Americas, dating to the 13th or 14th century. The codex was rediscovered in the city of Dresden, Germany, hence the book’s present name. 

-Wikipedia

THE JOURNEY, 2020, Carved Culk, paint, oil stick, pastel sticks and embroidery on canvas, 18 x 24 inches
SPELL FOR THE VISION SERPENT, 2020, paint, marker and scratches on clay, 10 x 6
PERMISSION 1, 2020, carved culk, paint, spell, oil stick, pastel sticks and embroidery on canvas, 18 x 24 inches
PERMISSION 2, 2020, carved culk, paint, spell, oil stick, pastel sticks and embroidery on canvas, 18 x 24 inches
THE BITE, 2020, paint, spell, marker and scratches on clay, 10 x 6 inches
METAMORPHOSING INTO AN OCTOPUS, 2020, paint, spell, marker and scratches on clay, 9 inches round
WARRIOR 1, 2020, paint, spell, marker and scratches on clay, 10 x 6 inches alone, 24.4 x 10.6 inches with the banana leaf
THE VISON, THE SUN AND THE KALOOMTE, 2020, paint, marker and thread on clay and banana leaf, 24.4 x 10.6 inches
VISION SERPENT, 2020, thread, paint, marker and scatches on Clay, 7 x 4.5 inches
METAMORPHOSING INTO AN OWl, 2020, paint, marker and scratches on clay, 3.5 H x 2.75 W x 4 L inches

(Left) The vision serpent. The hallucinatory visions central to Maya ritual were symbolized by a rearing snake. Most vision serpents have smooth bodies, some show areas of flayed skin and in some cases feathered bodies. Serpent heads have long sometimes bulbous snouts, and most are bearded.

(Right) “Metamorphosing into an Owl”, paint, spell, marker and scratches on clay, 5 x 3 inches, 2020. When death comes for me, I will rely on him the most to warn me so I am ready for my journey.

“The Aztecs and Maya, along with other natives of Mesoamerica, considered the owl a symbol of death and destruction. In fact, the Aztec god of death, Mictlantecuhtli, was often depicted with owls.[49] There is an old saying in Mexico that is still in use:[50] Cuando el tecolote canta, el indio muere (“When the owl cries/sings, the Indian dies”). The Popol Vuh, a Mayan religious text, describes owls as messengers of Xibalba (the Mayan “Place of Fright”).[51]” (wikipedia).

SNAKE+CROSS, 2020, paint, thread and scratches on clay, 10 x 6
Jamie Martinez, Vision Mask 1, leather, feathers, theard and shells on leather, 10 x 6 inches, 2020
GOD LANDA'S UAC MITUN AHAUJ (God A), 2019, oil and embroidery on painted canvas, 24 x 18 inches
WATER LORD, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.
THE SNAKE AND THE HIGH PRIEST, 2020, oil and spray paint on canvas, 24 x 18 inches
Jamie Martinez, Sacred Quetzal, Mayan poem, oil and spray paint and silver leaf with embroidered thread, 2019, 18 x 24 inches
SACRED QUETZAL, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.
SAVAGE, 2019, oil and embroidery on cotton, 30 x 30 inches
Jamie Martinez, Hernando El Puto de Soto, 2019, oil and acrylic paint with marker on C-Print, 11 x 14 inches
HERNANDO EL PUTO DEL SOTO, 2019, oil, acrylic paint and marker on C-Print, 11 x 14 inches.

Hernando de Soto (c. 1500 – May 21, 1542) was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who was involved in expeditions in Nicaragua and the Yucatan Peninsula, and played an important role in Pizarro’s conquest of the Inca Empire in Peru, but is best known for leading the first Spanish and European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States (through Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and most likely Arkansas). He is the first European documented as having crossed the Mississippi River.[5]  They used to cut the hands and feet of the Natives just to test the sharpness of their swords and for laughter.

BRUJO, 2019, oil and embroidery on cotton, 30 x 30 inches
LA SELVA, 2019, 2 seperate Mayan poems to be deciphered, ink and embroidery on salvaged leather and fake grass, approx 15 x 19 inches.
WATER LORD RITUAL, 2020, video + 3 photographs, ink and embroidery on leather.

WATER LORD RITUAL (VIDEO)

WATER LORD RITUAL, 2019, video, 1:03 sec, music by Incantations Maruch Mendez.

This ritual was originally performed on October 17th, 2018 at Rockaway Beach in Queens, New York with waves between the 1-3 foot range on a semi-cloudy day. It started with a painting I did of a poem I wrote called “Water Lord” using Mayan logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs. The process began with a meditation session to reveal a vision for this poem then I made an embroidered painting which then guided me to do this ghostly performance. The performance is to honor and display the respect I have for the water as if it were an entity or a god on its own. I celebrate its wetness, its fluidity, its availability to take on any share and since we all 75% water, I want to show its direct connection to our biology and to the dream world. 

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