I am One With the Jaguar

MAYAN POEMS/STORIES

This series of poems is based on the Mayan language which used logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs. The process begins with a meditation session to reveal a vision/message for each piece then I create the artwork. They are either on Paper Clay or canvases which are painted first then embroidered. On the back of each piece is the English translation of the poems or stories which only the artist knows.

The Kalomte , embroidery and oil paint on cotton 36 x 36 inches. This is found in the Jaguar Stones books. It’s a battle between two brothers for the power of the Jaguar Kingdom.

This is based on the story of the Kaloomte’ Bahlam – Kaloomteʼ Bahlam, also known as Curl Head, who was an ajaw or lord of the Maya city of Tikal. He took the throne in c. 511. He co-ruled with a Lady of Tikal.  This is the story of “Lord 6 Dog, Holy Lord of the Jaguar Kingdom – the Kalomte’, battled against Lord Tzelek his younger brother”

This is from the Jaguar Stone Books – This is the story of The Kaloomte’ Bahlam who battled his younger brother Lord Tzelek for control. 

Jamie Martinez art

The Kaloomte + Lady of Tikal, 2019, Paperclay, ink and thread, approx. 12″ x 8″.

The Kaloomte’ Bahlam, 2019, Paperclay, ink and thread, approx. 10″ x 7″.

Kalo’mte’ Ix Yo K’in (“Lady of Tikal“) – AD 511-527. Co-ruled with Kaloomte’ B’alam, possibly as consort. 

This is based on the story of the Kaloomte – Kaloomteʼ Bahlam, also known as Curl Head, was an ajaw or lord of the Maya city of Tikal. He took the throne on c. 511. He co-ruled with a Lady of Tikal. 

Lady of Tikal, also known as Woman of Tikal (September 1, 504 – after c. 527), was a queen of the Mayan city of Tikal. She took the throne on April 19, 511 and reigned until about 527.

“The Snake and the High Priest”, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.

“Water Lord”, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.

Jamie Martinez, Sacred Quetzal, Mayan poem, oil and spray paint and silver leaf with embroidered thread, 2019, 18 x 24 inches

The Snake and the High Priest, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.

Sacred Quetzal, 2019, original Mayan poem (English version is written on the back), oil and spray paint with embroidered thread, 24 x 18 inches.

Jamie Martinez, Hernando El Puto de Soto, 2019, oil and acrylic paint with marker on C-Print, 11 x 14 inches

Hernando El Puto de Soto, Mayan Poem, 2019, acrylic on printed canvas and embroidered thread, 18 x 24 inches.

Hernando El Puto de Soto, 2019, oil, acrylic paint and marker on C-Print, 11 x 14 inches.

Hernando de Soto (c. 1500 – May 21, 1542) was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who was involved in expeditions in Nicaragua and the Yucatan Peninsula, and played an important role in Pizarro’s conquest of the Inca Empire in Peru, but is best known for leading the first Spanish and European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States (through Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and most likely Arkansas). He is the first European documented as having crossed the Mississippi River.[5] 

They used to cut the hands and feet of the Natives just to test the sharpness of their swords and for laughter.

Jamie Martinez, Brujo, 2019, oil and embroidery on cotton, 30 x 30 inches.

Jamie Martinez, La Selva, 2019, 2 seperate Mayan poems to be deciphered, ink and embroidery on salvaged leather and fake grass, approx 15 x 19 inches.

WATER LORD RITUAL (VIDEO)

Jamie Martinez,  “Water Lord Ritual”, 2019, video, 1:03 sec, music by Incantations Maruch Mendez.

Ritual performance for “Water Lord”, Video + 3 photographs, ink and embroidery on leather. 

This ritual was originally performed on October 17th, 2018 at Rockaway Beach in Queens, New York with waves between the 1-3 foot range on a semi-cloudy day. It started with a painting I did of a poem I wrote called “Water Lord” using Mayan logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs. The process began with a meditation session to reveal a vision for this poem then I made an embroidered painting which then guided me to do this ghostly performance. The performance is to honor and display the respect I have for the water as if it were an entity or a god on its own. I celebrate its wetness, its fluidity, its availability to take on any share and since we all 75% water, I want to show its direct connection to our biology and to the dream world. 

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